Hello. Write your message here. Link text here

Arrow up
Arrow down

 

 

Give me just one generation of youth, and I'll transform the whole world.”-Vladimir Lenin

 

Feds/Big Tech Join To Push Addiction in Schools

By Carole Hornsby Haynes, Ph.D. March 25, 2018 World Net Daily

The federal government, bent on collecting massive amounts of personal information on its citizens – a flagrant violation of the Fourth Amendment – and the tech industry, under fire for its digital products designed to addict, have joined forces in American classrooms.

Through the unconstitutional Every Student Succeeds Act passed in 2015 under the Obama administration, digital devices with computer adaptive software for both lessons and testing are pushed into K-12 classrooms.

Truth About Tech: Addiction By Design

By Carole Hornsby Haynes, Ph.D. February 9, 2018 World Net Daily

What many parents have suspected is now being exposed by former Silicon Valley employees: that tech companies have designed their digital products to be addictive.

The Center for Humane Technology, which was recently founded by former Google and Facebook employees, has joined forces with media watchdog, Common Sense Media. In their first campaign – Truth About Tech – they will educate millions of consumers about the dangers of tech products and pressure tech companies to create less addictive and less intrusive products.

Big Government and Elites Love Datapalooza
By Carole Hornsby Haynes, Ph.D.   October 9, 2017   Eagle Forum Report September 2017

Students can no longer attend public schools and expect to get a broad based academic education.  Instead they are pawns of Big Government and Big Business.

For Big Government, public education is the preferred vehicle to implement a Soviet-style planned economy to replace capitalism and the fierce American individualism that we treasure.  For Big Business, American K-12 is at least a $500 billion market, according to Rupert Murdoch of News Corp.

Are Texas Lawmakers Funding ‘Digital Heroin’ for School Children?   
By Carole Hornsby Haynes, Ph.D.    February 13, 2017    Texas Insider

The Texas House Committee on Public Education wants to utilize high-tech digital learning to improve student achievement and fulfill future workforce demands. The popular notion is that students need computer time to compete in the 21st century.

Yet at the epicenter of the technology industry some parents hold a contrarian viewpoint, choosing instead to send their children to schools that have no computers at all and some even frown on home computers.   

Online Charter Schools Show Disappointing Results

By Carole Hornsby Haynes, Ph.D. |  November 12, 2015  National Center for Policy Analysis

The Center for Research on Educational Options (CREDO) at Stanford University recently published its findings for a study about the academic impact of online charter schools.  Only full-time online charter students in seventeen states and Washington, D.C. were included.

The study sought to answer whether e-schools are a niche option that best fit a small group of students possessing a specific set of characteristics or whether they are a viable solution for educational challenges for today’s families.

Classroom Technology: Research Increasingly Shows No Measureable Improvement
By Carole Hornsby Haynes  |  February 20, 2017  Texas Insider

In 1996 the Telecommunications Act was enacted to provide subsidies for schools to access broadband service through the Schools and Libraries program, also known as the E-rate program.  After spending more than $40 billion of taxpayers’ money, the program is just another big government fiasco.

American K-12 education is spending nearly $5 billion annually on technology, while cutting budgets and laying off teachers.  Even though school reformers want to believe that digitized learning has the potential to revolutionize education, research is piling up that technology does not lead to measureable improvements in student achievement, but rather is depressing it.  

Online Community College Courses Show Paradoxical Results

By Carole Hornsby Haynes   |  November 15, 2015   National Center for Policy Analysis

Community colleges are attended by 45 percent of the nation’s undergraduates.  Currently the community college sector is under fire for low graduation rates. Only 25 to 30 percent of students who begin their studies at a community college complete their degrees or transfer to a four-year college.  Enrollments are decreasing.

To cut costs while attempting to boost enrollment, community college leaders tout the flexibility of online courses.

joomla visitor